Imagine by Iva Wilcox

Your awesome Tagline

4,143 notes

Delish!
lessthan300kcal:

Triple Chocolate Chunk Muffin Knock-Offs of Whole Food’s 6 Dollar per 4 Chocolate Chunk VitaTop Muffins
Ingredients:
1 3/4 c oats
 3 egg whites
 3/4 cup unsweetened cocoa
1/2 cup unsweetened applesauce
1 tsp. vanilla extract
1/2 cup plain Greek yogurt (or regular plain low fat yogurt)
1/2 tsp cream of tartar (or 1-1/2 Tbsp. vinegar)
1-1/2 tsp. baking powder
1-1/2 tsp. baking soda
1/4 tsp. salt
1 cup hot water
1 cup sugar substitute (like Splenda granular) OR 1/4 cup + 2 tbs stevia
1/2 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips (or use white chocolate or peanut butter chips!)
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line 2 (12-cup) muffin pans with foil cupcake liners, or spray muffin tin with non-stick cooking spray. Set aside.In a blender, (or food processor), mix all of the ingredients together, except for the chocolate chips. Blend until oats are ground and mixture is smooth.Place mixture in a bowl and gently stir in 1/2 of the chocolate chips (set the rest aside). Scoop mixture into prepared muffin pans.Place muffins tins in the oven for 10 minutes.  After 10 minutes, remove muffins from the oven (but don’t shut oven off), and distribute the other half of the chocolate chips on top of each muffin.Place  the muffins back into the oven and bake for an additional 2-5 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean. *Note, you could skip this step by putting all of the chips in the batter, and baking the muffins for 12-15 min straight, but this method gives the muffins the traditional ‘VitaTop Muffin’ look with the chocolate chips on top!Cool muffins before removing from pan. ENJOY!!! Servings: 12 Big Muffins or 24 Smaller MuffinsCalories: 116 Calories Per Muffin or 58 Calories Per Muffin 
*drooling*
THERE HAS BEEN SUCH WONDERFUL FOOD ON MY DASH
Delish!

lessthan300kcal:

Triple Chocolate Chunk Muffin Knock-Offs of Whole Food’s 6 Dollar per 4 Chocolate Chunk VitaTop Muffins

Ingredients:

1 3/4 c oats

  •  3 egg whites
  •  3/4 cup unsweetened cocoa
  • 1/2 cup unsweetened applesauce
  • 1 tsp. vanilla extract
  • 1/2 cup plain Greek yogurt (or regular plain low fat yogurt)
  • 1/2 tsp cream of tartar (or 1-1/2 Tbsp. vinegar)
  • 1-1/2 tsp. baking powder
  • 1-1/2 tsp. baking soda
  • 1/4 tsp. salt
  • 1 cup hot water
  • 1 cup sugar substitute (like Splenda granular) OR 1/4 cup + 2 tbs stevia
  • 1/2 cup semi-sweet chocolate chips (or use white chocolate or peanut butter chips!)

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Line 2 (12-cup) muffin pans with foil cupcake liners, or spray muffin tin with non-stick cooking spray. Set aside.
In a blender, (or food processor), mix all of the ingredients together, except for the chocolate chips. Blend until oats are ground and mixture is smooth.
Place mixture in a bowl and gently stir in 1/2 of the chocolate chips (set the rest aside). Scoop mixture into prepared muffin pans.
Place muffins tins in the oven for 10 minutes.  After 10 minutes, remove muffins from the oven (but don’t shut oven off), and distribute the other half of the chocolate chips on top of each muffin.
Place  the muffins back into the oven and bake for an additional 2-5 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean. *Note, you could skip this step by putting all of the chips in the batter, and baking the muffins for 12-15 min straight, but this method gives the muffins the traditional ‘VitaTop Muffin’ look with the chocolate chips on top!
Cool muffins before removing from pan. ENJOY!!! 
Servings: 12 Big Muffins or 24 Smaller Muffins
Calories: 116 Calories Per Muffin or 58 Calories Per Muffin

*drooling*

THERE HAS BEEN SUCH WONDERFUL FOOD ON MY DASH

(via healthyisalwaysbetter-deactivat)

124 notes

For these beings, fall is ever the normal season, the only weather, there be no choice beyond. Where do they come from? The dust. Where do they go? The grave. Does blood stir their veins? No: the night wind. What ticks in their head? The worm. What speaks from their mouth? The toad. What sees from their eye? The snake. What hears with their ear? The abyss between the stars. They sift the human storm for souls, eat flesh of reason, fill tombs with sinners. They frenzy forth….Such are the autumn people.
Ray Bradbury, “The Autumn People” (via 365daysofhalloween)

(via allthefacesallthevoicesblur)

25 notes

mothtales:

Singerie is a French term which translates to “Monkey Trick”. A popular trend among French artists in the early eighteenth century, the term is mostly reserved for a type of decorative painting which includes monkeys – fashionably attired and often acting in human behaviors.Obviously, the popularity of singerie continued well into the nineteenth century, and was also translated into mechanical art in the example of this amazing automaton, a creation of Jean Marie Phalibois, circa 1880. Gaze upon this elegant and colorful tableau and one will see – the somewhat shocking at first – scene of two monkeys, a lady and a gentleman wearing expensive, silken finery, enjoying an elegant, open air repast – gaily chatting, eating and drinking. The gentleman seems to be concentrating solely on the drink, while his companion slices away at her entree with the knife she holds in her hand.Accompanied by beautiful music, two tunes to be exact, the intricate movements include those of the lady monkey who slices her entree, raises the morsel in her fork toward her mouth, while her jaw moves in a chewing (or chatting) motion, her head turns from side to side – at times briskly, and her eyes flutter. The gentleman monkey lifts the wine bottle in his left hand, turns his head toward it, as if to read the label. In his left hand he holds a goblet which he lifts toward his moving jaw to take a drink, then lowers it back to the table, all the while his eyes blink.

mothtales:

Singerie is a French term which translates to “Monkey Trick”. A popular trend among French artists in the early eighteenth century, the term is mostly reserved for a type of decorative painting which includes monkeys – fashionably attired and often acting in human behaviors.
Obviously, the popularity of singerie continued well into the nineteenth century, and was also translated into mechanical art in the example of this amazing automaton, a creation of Jean Marie Phalibois, circa 1880. 
Gaze upon this elegant and colorful tableau and one will see – the somewhat shocking at first – scene of two monkeys, a lady and a gentleman wearing expensive, silken finery, enjoying an elegant, open air repast – gaily chatting, eating and drinking. The gentleman seems to be concentrating solely on the drink, while his companion slices away at her entree with the knife she holds in her hand.
Accompanied by beautiful music, two tunes to be exact, the intricate movements include those of the lady monkey who slices her entree, raises the morsel in her fork toward her mouth, while her jaw moves in a chewing (or chatting) motion, her head turns from side to side – at times briskly, and her eyes flutter. 
The gentleman monkey lifts the wine bottle in his left hand, turns his head toward it, as if to read the label. In his left hand he holds a goblet which he lifts toward his moving jaw to take a drink, then lowers it back to the table, all the while his eyes blink.